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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
in our schools and in our communities, educating everybody and helping us create the very good marketing education campaign that we need to remind everybody to do so. and then our health department, of course. they carry the very serious burden of giving us statistics, of what it is on the collision as well as injury rates and reminding us that a healthier city could be one that we reduce the fatalities that happen with pedestrians. so, this is part of that whole strategy. we will consider areas of the city that we will have to lower the speed limit and enforce it and educate people around it, as well as more serious and higher and deeper ways of educating the public and the drivers as well as pedestrians themselves. this is all part of i think a good strategy, one that i'm very willing to lead and make sure every department and all of the store fronts along here, as well as people who drive cars in and out of the city, understand we're going to focus on all the hot spots and really lessen that inequality we know today, neighborhoods, people literally fear walking on our streets because
charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and wit
education and remembering general norman schwarzkopf. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. toda
. hundreds of educators attend a free gun class in utah. it's the latest response to the newtown school massacre that's attracting a lot of attention this morning. >>> thousands of dockworkers could put the u.s. economy at risk if they go on strike on sunday. we'll take you inside the crisis some are calling the container cliff. >>> and sea world taking its water act all the way to wall street. why investors could soon own a peace of shamu. "newsroom" starts right now. good morning. i'm victor blackwell. carol has the morning off. with the nation still reeling from the shooting massacre in newtown, connecticut, and engaged in a national debate on gun control, chicago suffered a grim milestone last night, a man was killed in a shooting on chicago's dangerous west side. this scene marks chicago's 500th homicide this year alone. that's up more than 50 from last year. now when we're researching this story this morning, one statistic really jumped out at us. in the past five years, 270 children have been killed by gun violence in chicago. on top of that, there have been dozens of other peopl
regarding their voting records and actions in regard to, say, equity in education and access to health care and fiar pay. and i actually have to say i link the fairness and focus on just this in regard to domestic issues and international issues. i do not apply those values just to u.s. citizens but to apply the same desires for fairness and justice with regard to our foreign policy, u.s. foreign- policy. i do find that my religious upbringing does -- is interwoven in however prison as. host: rich from tennessee. independent caller. caller: merry christmas, greta. host: good morning, merry christmas. caller: i echo the last caller. i would say my politics changed from republican to it independent. i voted the constitution party the last presidential election. but i found that most people who are serious voters do consider moral beliefs, our laws are based on morality. whether the source is a religion or their own sense of morality which they probably borrowed from other religions, how can you not consider morality and believes when you are voting? otherwise, you are simply pushing a lever b
election night win over republican rival mitt romney. california's public education system was saved from severe budget cuts with the november passage of governor brown's proposition 30, but voters didn't say yes to all taxes. an attempt to tax soda in richmond failed, as did a statewide tobacco tax on the june ballot. new districts drawn by a citizens commission and the voter-approved top two primary system shook up races for congress and the state legislature, putting a record number of freshmen in the assembly and giving democrats a rare supermajority in sacramento. it was the beginning of realignment of the state's criminal justice system, and voters approved reform of the state's tough three strikes sentencing law. the economy sputtered but finally showed signs of improvement in the housing and job market, but in silicon valley, the highly anticipated facebook ipo fell flat. the city of stockton made headlines as the largest city in the u.s. to ever file for bankruptcy. and a deadly shooting at oikos university in oakland left seven people dead and a community in shock. and obama car
with secretary of education arne duncan. >> schools have been forever the safe haven, often safest places in the community. and we need to continue to do everything in our power to make sure that they are. >> woodruff: kwame holman updates washington's spending and tax stalemate after house republicans decide not to follow the leader. >> brown: and mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the remaking of the obama administration's foreign policy team began today as the president nominat
educated middle class on one camp and the so-called islamists and majority of the illiterate part on the other side. that's not the way we expected after the uprising. we need a charter that unifies people that not talking about controversial issues like role, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of worship but talk about science, technology, health care, that is what people compare about. we are going through difficult time that the economy is falling apart, standard and poor downgraded us to a d minus. not in the greatest shape. we need to see a way to move forward. but it is difficult time right now. >> ifill: but if these numbers hold, it looks like pretty significant victory for the muslim brotherhood, was this silent majority that was speaking? >> i'm not sure it's a silent majority. you have islamists which is probably like 30% of the country the rest are as you know, one-third of the country is illiterate. they are being told that this is stability. i think they have right to think that way. going through turbulent time for two years, if you tell them this
at the catholic school and the north side of chicago where my firstborn started his education, the school is an american rainbow. african, polish, mexican, croatian, you name it, it's there all gathered at the christmas pageant. standing on the rickety stage gleefully parading about in a santa hats. talking to his friend, the chinese grow with the white mom and pakistan. i am cooling in the year of our newborn baby when the signal comes in the class starts in on their signs on. a little wobbly and first, what they catch the swing soon enough, and when they hit the course i cannot help myself. i start to sing along. i love this melody. i love this side of my sweet kid among all these other sweet kids. hammer and bring-your are i felt on my first fight in a redwood forest, the adrenaline pumping through my veins . my sons will make their own memories. one day they will realize just what it means that this land is their land and that they share it with 310 million others. it when my baby will come crying in the middle of the nine would walk up and down the hallway singing this song. a long t
, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. >>> we love sitting at the fireplace getting cozy and the cold winter mornings and nights but it turns out we are not the only ones. look at this the movingies at a zoo in central japan love gathering around a warm fire and roasting smores. zoo keepers say the campfire every day they keep it going during the winter for their monkies they have 160 and they satan malls love sitting by the flames and warming their backs. zoo keepers used the fire to bake potatoe. they say the treats are always a big hit or at least that's what the zoo keepers say. >> you thought they liked bananas. >> this is bella a record breaking great dane according to guinness book of world records she is the world's tallest living female dog. bella is in arizona weighing 170 pounds and she eats four cups of food every day. wow. she is standing on all fours she is over 4 feet tall and her owners say they were inspired to put her in the running for
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has ground. n.ese are -- has grown a these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for its. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and yo
were on our site. the idea was the state cannot make an educational opportunity available for one sex only. in any event, that left justice scalia as the lone dissenter in the vmi case. now, the case about the family medical leave act and the chiefs understanding that it was important not to make this a maternity leave, that it should be part of the workers life when you have a sick child, a sick spouse, a sick parent, you can take time off for that putting did the job in jeopardy. well, i'd like to say that i had something to do with it. i don't think that's too. i think a case that came before the court influenced him. but most of all, i think he was influenced by his granddaughte granddaughters. one of his daughters was divorced and she had two girls, and the old chief cut took responsibility for being a male parent figure for those girls. they loved him, and i think he, he thought about how he would like the world to be for them. >> when you think about this evolution, starting really didn't read versus reed in 1971, which was a case involving an idaho probate law that said males
part-time or summer hire. we never did get into the education thing at all. we are focused on doing a job. my point on education is that there is something revolutionary that needs to happen. if you look now in the internet age and realize the rate at which a student downloads information -- the people who are really smart are bored. i think within maybe 20-25 years, you won't see a classroom typically like we do, where you see everybody goes to a classroom. it is for that reason, it is not a good thing to teach people who are going to be innovators later on. next question. >> thank you very much for your talk. what skills, academic, etc., do you need at early ages to facilitate creativity and innovation? how can parents and schools shape these attributes for kids? >> in answering that, i am going to focus on word that you said. you said cultivate. the point i have tried to make is that if things are going around in the world outside of the kid's community, outside of his local interface and outside of his school, if he sees wonderful progress happen, that is so different -- that is
some rights but underminds others. >>> now that voters have approved higher taxes for education, governor brown wants to overall the state funning and at least low income mine 40 district. crews in the north bay are looking into the cause of a midway water break. crews shut the water and closed traffic in the area and there is no word on what caused the break. >>> john mcafee is believed to be spending this christmas week in great britain. he is stating he was safe and has been hiding from authorities and he is wanted in the suspicious death of his neighbor. >>> and construction is the fastest growing industry according to the state development dent. meanwhile retail, restaurants, bars hotels and manufacturing have also seen improvements and growth is filling into cities like san francisco san mateo and marin counties. >>> let's turn to tara moriarty, because she is following an accident in the east bay, tara? >>> that's right, the rain is taking a toll on the commute and cars are so slippery they are slipping all over the place. if we take a look at our maps, we can zoom in on
such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it has touched everybody across this country. san francisco is no different. and i have shared that emotional experience with the supervisor and everybody here, in our law enforcement, and in our health department as well. the question for us, then, is what do we do about it? and not only can we share in this tragedy and signal our sympathies to the families as we've done, but we've got to do something more. and this is where i want to make sure i re
was astonishing. he was driven primarily by this incredible will that he had and thirst for education. he was embarrassed to did not finish college, so he finished law school instead. he went on and on. the idea of senator byrd as majority leader of the senate is quite remarkable. he came into the senate with the great class of 1958. they set the foundation for what i call the great senate that came later, the progressive senate. it was a democratic landslide that year. he was undeniably the most conservative of senators elected. philip hart, a whole -- whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. he opposed thurgood marshall when he was nominated. senator byrd was so conservative on some of these issues that in 1971,richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time.
of mechanisms. we have consumer education and division. we develop blogs end contents that gets distributed to all kinds of community partners. we also make sure people are aware of research that shows what the benefits are of people saying their credit reports and knowing them and knowing their credit scores. there is a recent article from the federal reserve bank of boston that shows some of the potential benefits of consumers knowing their scores when they apply for credit and not knowing their scores. i want to point out power constituent offices where we do special outrage to service members. have an office of students and an office of older americans and those offices have developed specialized channels for communicating what in particular about credit reports and scores is important for those particular groups to know and we are trying to make the message available to each of those groups at the most taechable small men's. >> thank you very much. may i then ask you to give my regards to holly petraeus. she did to map to hawaii to talk to us about financial literacy and did a great jo
-time newtown residents. >> we lost 20 beautiful young children and six educators. it hurts to think we can't as a community come together with more he restrictive rules and regulations to prohibit the sale of these weapons. >> the management of nra is real not taking their responsibility for what they are doing. >> reporter: in the meantime the mother of 6-year-old noah pozner told nbc news how difficult his death has been on her family, especially on her youngest surviving child. >> she has lost her twin, and that's irreplaceable. you can't buy, beg, borrow, on or steal any of it. they were nine months side by side. now they won't be for the rest of their lives. >> reporter: noah's big sister, 19-year-old danielle, says she and her family are comforted by all the well wishes that poured into their homele town, evidence on the street near the school and piling up at the post office. >> i think it's great. it's some sort of -- it's some sort of comfort to know there's to many people there for us. it's sad that he'll never get it to live his life, but i'm happy that we got the six years that
have let a lot of this go on and did not put the man to task. >> makes no sense of all the educated people we have in the region you can't come up with a comprehensive plan and stick with the plan. >> the second inauguration of barack obama is also at hand. what will we see differently here? >> probably not the huge crowds you saw, because that was a historical moment, the first african-american president, and everybody wanted to say they were there. i don't think you will have that crowd. and secondly, i think they learned a lot of lessons, because there were a lot of mistakes made from the distribution of too many tickets to tunnels being closed, and people redirected. i think it's going to be much, much better. >> you talk about the closing of the tunnel, and it was not so much they closed the 3rd street tunnel, it's the fact that people got stuck in the 3rd street opportunity for hours and questions about safety came about, and they say they are going to hire more staff, more monitors around the mall and the capital where the inauguration takes place. >> they will follow social
can look at what your health insurance premiums are doing, your education bills but y favorite site is something called shadow stats, they track cpi and it varies between 8, 10, 12 percent depending on which versions you use. because every administration seems to adjust those figures to proactively reflect and keep them down. and the government has every incentive to do that because cost of living increases are tied to that, military spending is tied to that, a lot of things are tied to cost of livings increases that are in fact tied to inflation. david: let's face it, the federal reserve has become a branch of the u.s. government essentially. it's supposed to be a private institution. it's been essentially printing money to bail out all of the free spending politicians. that means less money in our pocket. >> well, that's right. you know, this illusion that government spending is in fact going to make up for the private spending gap is just that, it's an illusion. it hasn't worked that way throughout history on anything other than a short-term basis. it may stave off the pain now,
squeeze investment thes in the next generation. education, infrastructure, research. there really needs to be a balance both between taxes and spending and then on the spending side between restraining discretionary spending and restraining entitlements which are aimed at today's seniors. >> so many times we've heard talk about generational warfare between old and young. but this is a little bit different. >> right. first of all, there is no -- today there is generational warfare more in the opposite direction. the polls show that young people by and large are willing to pay for entitlements for today's seniors. what's eroded is the willingness of today's senior ares to pay for social spending that benefits today's young people. the federal government today spends $7 per capita on seniors for every dollar it invests in kids. and the electoral paradox here is that democrats are winning overwhelming majorities over these nonwhite young people. 6 60% of white steeniors voted fo romney. and there's a risk over time if they're not restrained, they can squeeze out spending investment on young
. >> thank you mr. chairman. >> the vice president of litigation from the mexican defense and education fund. she is well known in the civil-rights community for the work on voting rights and the cases include lack versus perry and challenged texas congressional redistricting which she led through the trial and appeal to the supreme court. the floor is yours. >> members of the judiciary committee thank you for inviting me to testify today. today latinos constitute the largest racial minority group in the united states. over the past decade the number of latino eligible voters, a u.s. citizen adel increased from 13 million to 21 million. as the latino and other racial minority communities of grown and expanded the u.s. electorate, some states have attempted to slow the registration and participation of new voters. for example, arizona adopted a new law in 2004 that changed the voter registration rules to require only new boulder registrants to provide dhaka entry proof of the u.s. citizenship. proposition 200 as it is called has had broad - impact on the voter registration across arizona. fal
enough job just being educators and being teachers in our community, and i think the issue of gun violence is -- is a challenging one. and i think there are many solutions to the problem. we just need to be able to bring folks together in a way that we can have sensible conversations about these issues and figure out the best course of action moving forward. >> that was bill and sierra toomey earlier this morning. and if you want to find out how to help connecticut shooting victims, if to cnn.com/impact. >>> tax hikes, irs tax refund delays, so much remains on the line without a deal to avert the so-called fiscal cliff. how close is washington to bridging the divide? this holiday, share everything. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. hurry in for a droid incredible 4g lte by htc for $49.99. it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyo
have requested apparently that she pay back that $66,000 they spent on her education. could she be forced to do so? >> listen, the bottom line is that one thing does not necessarily relate to the other. when it relates to stalking and abusive behavior, that's one thing. that was certainly within the court's jurisdiction. when you're talking about prior things that were paid for your daughter and then you say because i cat control you anymore, i want to claw back and take that money, you know, it's not likely that as a result of that she should have to pay it back. furthermore, what we have to understand is that the whole issue of them paying had to do, you can argue, with control. >>> food, family, fun, what's all that? a recipe for success if you're in the restaurant business. at least that's what martin savidge found out when he traveled to cleveland to visit one of our 100 places where the locals eat. >> reporter: i'm martin savidge, and i grew up in cleveland. trust me, if you're looking to eat where the clevelander eat, it doesn't get any more clevelander than here. for mor
arming one educator per school. attorney general horn, how did you come up with the plan and why are you trying to implement it. >> i tried to come up with a golden mean between two extremes. one point is teachers come nothing the school with guns. i think that creates danger. but if we do nothing and there is an incident like new ton that could have been prevented. one person could be armed. principal or desig nee. i oered to provide training on when and how to secower the fire arm x. offered to provide free training . if the schools want to do it we'll do it. if they don't that is fine. we are offering a free service to my investigators who are sworn police officers and provide training to a principal or his designee. >> kelly: you are giving the school a choice of agreeing to do this and that training has to be extensive, right. >> yes, not just marksmanship. but training of when and not to shoot and how to exercise judgment . you have simulations. i have gone through this. it simulates thuation and so you learn how to react correctly. >> kelly: you are drawing criticism from other pe
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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